Arrays

Syntax

  • [1,2,3]
  • [1 2 3]
  • [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]
  • Array(type, dims...)
  • ones(type, dims...)
  • zeros(type, dims...)
  • trues(type, dims...)
  • falses(type, dims...)
  • push!(A, x)
  • pop!(A)
  • unshift!(A, x)
  • shift!(A)

Parameters

ParametersRemarks
Forpush!(A, x), unshift!(A, x)
AThe array to add to.
xThe element to add to the array.

Array types

In Julia, Arrays have types parametrized by two variables: a type T and a dimensionality D (Array{T, D}). For a 1-dimensional array of integers, the type is:

julia> x = [1, 2, 3];
julia> typeof(x)
Array{Int64, 1}

If the array is a 2-dimensional matrix, D equals to 2:

julia> x = [1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]
julia> typeof(x)
Array{Int64, 2}

The element type can also be abstract types:

julia> x = [1 2 3; 4 5 "6"; 7 8 9]
3x3 Array{Any,2}:
 1  2  3   
 4  5 "6"
 7  8  9

Here Any (an abstract type) is the type of the resulting array.

Specifying Types when Creating Arrays

When we create an Array in the way described above, Julia will do its best to infer the proper type that we might want. In the initial examples above, we entered inputs that looked like integers, and so Julia defaulted to the default Int64 type. At times, however, we might want to be more specific. In the following example, we specify that we want the type to be instead Int8:

x1 = Int8[1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]
typeof(x1)  ## Array{Int8,2}

We could even specify the type as something such as Float64, even if we write the inputs in a way that might otherwise be interpreted as integers by default (e.g. writing 1 instead of 1.0). e.g.

x2 = Float64[1 2 3; 4 5 6; 7 8 9]

Arrays of Arrays - Properties and Construction

In Julia, you can have an Array that holds other Array type objects. Consider the following examples of initializing various types of Arrays:

A = Array{Float64}(10,10)  # A single Array, dimensions 10 by 10, of Float64 type objects

B = Array{Array}(10,10,10)  # A 10 by 10 by 10 Array.  Each element is an Array of unspecified type and dimension.

C = Array{Array{Float64}}(10)  ## A length 10, one-dimensional Array.  Each element is an Array of Float64 type objects but unspecified dimensions

D = Array{Array{Float64, 2}}(10)  ## A length 10, one-dimensional Array.  Each element of is an 2 dimensional array of Float 64 objects

Consider for instance, the differences between C and D here:

julia> C[1] = rand(3)
3-element Array{Float64,1}:
 0.604771
 0.985604
 0.166444

julia> D[1] = rand(3)
ERROR: MethodError: 

rand(3) produces an object of type Array{Float64,1}. Since the only specification for the elements of C are that they be Arrays with elements of type Float64, this fits within the definition of C. But, for D we specified that the elements must be 2 dimensional Arrays. Thus, since rand(3) does not produce a 2 dimensional array, we cannot use it to assign a value to a specific element of D

Specify Specific Dimensions of Arrays within an Array

Although we can specify that an Array will hold elements which are of type Array, and we can specify that, e.g. those elements should be 2-dimensional Arrays, we cannot directly specify the dimenions of those elements. E.g. we can't directly specify that we want an Array holding 10 Arrays, each of which being 5,5. We can see this from the syntax for the Array() function used to construct an Array:

Array{T}(dims)

constructs an uninitialized dense array with element type T. dims may be a tuple or a series of integer arguments. The syntax Array(T, dims) is also available, but deprecated.

The type of an Array in Julia encompasses the number of the dimensions but not the size of those dimensions. Thus, there is no place in this syntax to specify the precise dimensions. Nevertheless, a similar effect could be achieved using an Array comprehension:

E = [Array{Float64}(5,5) for idx in 1:10]

Note: this documentation mirrors the following SO Answer

Concatenation

It is often useful to build matrices out of smaller matrices.

Horizontal Concatenation

Matrices (and vectors, which are treated as column vectors) can be horizontally concatenated using the hcat function.

julia> hcat([1 2; 3 4], [5 6 7; 8 9 10], [11, 12])
2×6 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  5  6   7  11
 3  4  8  9  10  12

There is convenience syntax available, using square bracket notation and spaces:

julia> [[1 2; 3 4] [5 6 7; 8 9 10] [11, 12]]
2×6 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  5  6   7  11
 3  4  8  9  10  12

This notation can closely match the notation for block matrices used in linear algebra:

julia> A = [1 2; 3 4]
2×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2
 3  4

julia> B = [5 6; 7 8]
2×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 5  6
 7  8

julia> [A B]
2×4 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  5  6
 3  4  7  8

Note that you cannot horizontally concatenate a single matrix using the [] syntax, as that would instead create a one-element vector of matrices:

julia> [A]
1-element Array{Array{Int64,2},1}:
 [1 2; 3 4]

Vertical Concatenation

Vertical concatenation is like horizontal concatenation, but in the vertical direction. The function for vertical concatenation is vcat.

julia> vcat([1 2; 3 4], [5 6; 7 8; 9 10], [11 12])
6×2 Array{Int64,2}:
  1   2
  3   4
  5   6
  7   8
  9  10
 11  12

Alternatively, square bracket notation can be used with semicolons ; as the delimiter:

julia> [[1 2; 3 4]; [5 6; 7 8; 9 10]; [11 12]]
6×2 Array{Int64,2}:
  1   2
  3   4
  5   6
  7   8
  9  10
 11  12

Vectors can be vertically concatenated too; the result is a vector:

julia> A = [1, 2, 3]
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3

julia> B = [4, 5]
2-element Array{Int64,1}:
 4
 5

julia> [A; B]
5-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5

Horizontal and vertical concatenation can be combined:

julia> A = [1 2
            3 4]
2×2 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2
 3  4

julia> B = [5 6 7]
1×3 Array{Int64,2}:
 5  6  7

julia> C = [8, 9]
2-element Array{Int64,1}:
 8
 9

julia> [A C; B]
3×3 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  8
 3  4  9
 5  6  7

Initialize an Empty Array

We can use the [] to create an empty Array in Julia. The simplest example would be:

A = [] # 0-element Array{Any,1}

Arrays of type Any will generally not perform as well as those with a specified type. Thus, for instance, we can use:

B = Float64[]  ## 0-element Array{Float64,1}
C = Array{Float64}[]  ## 0-element Array{Array{Float64,N},1}
D = Tuple{Int, Int}[] ## 0-element Array{Tuple{Int64,Int64},1}

See Initialize an Empty Array of Tuples in Julia for source of last example.

Manual construction of a simple array

One can initialize a Julia array by hand, using the square-brackets syntax:

julia> x = [1, 2, 3]
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3

The first line after the command shows the size of the array you created. It also shows the type of its elements and its dimensionality (int this case Int64 and 1, repectively). For a two-dimensional array, you can use spaces and semi-colon:

julia> x = [1 2 3; 4 5 6]
2x3 Array{Int64,2}:
 1  2  3
 4  5  6

To create an uninitialized array, you can use the Array(type, dims...) method:

julia> Array(Int64, 3, 3)
3x3 Array{Int64,2}:
 0  0  0
 0  0  0
 0  0  0

The functions zeros, ones, trues, falses have methods that behave exactly the same way, but produce arrays full of 0.0, 1.0, True or False, respectively.

Vectors

Vectors are one-dimensional arrays, and support mostly the same interface as their multi-dimensional counterparts. However, vectors also support additional operations.

First, note that Vector{T} where T is some type means the same as Array{T,1}.

julia> Vector{Int}
Array{Int64,1}

julia> Vector{Float64}
Array{Float64,1}

One reads Array{Int64,1} as "one-dimensional array of Int64".

Unlike multi-dimensional arrays, vectors can be resized. Elements can be added or removed from the front or back of the vector. These operations are all constant amortized time.

julia> A = [1, 2, 3]
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3

julia> push!(A, 4)
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4

julia> A
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3
 4

julia> pop!(A)
4

julia> A
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3

julia> unshift!(A, 0)
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 0
 1
 2
 3

julia> A
4-element Array{Int64,1}:
 0
 1
 2
 3

julia> shift!(A)
0

julia> A
3-element Array{Int64,1}:
 1
 2
 3

As is convention, each of these functions push!, pop!, unshift!, and shift! ends in an exclamation mark to indicate that they are mutate their argument. The functions push! and unshift! return the array, whereas pop! and shift! return the element removed.



2016-08-12
2016-10-30
Julia Language Pedia
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